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university press. it's a collection of scholarly and journalistic articles about the taliban and the environment in southern afghanistan and western pakistan. , and it born as an attempt at new america by a diverse group of researchers to get at some of the diversity of the taliban itself at the time when the united states was puzzling over the rejury gent as a movement and a political force in afghanistan. as a military challenge, and really a challenge that had been neglected in the years after the 2001 defeat of the islamic member of the afghanistan. and which revived and presented itself as a grave d.a. lem that toment obama administration as it arrived in 2009. our effort to cowhat think tanks do. provide ground for it an complexity and granularity about this phenomena. recognizing that the sort of clicheed image of one eyed -- and his band of the devoted and attractable fan net tack was inadequate and falsifying of the problem. so the purpose was not prosecute a particular view of the taliban but just to start to document some sections of the diversity. and some aspect
which was banned by the former taliban regime as unislamic. ♪ >> students from the afghanistan national institute of music performed traditional afghan tunes. in new york's prestigious carnegie hall on tuesday. the school was established in 2010 under the afghan administration of education with hefty financial support from abroad. half the school's 140 students are orphans or street children. one-third of them are girls. musicians ranging in age from 10 to 22 also enjoyed the rare opportunity to perform alongside a local american high school orchestra. >> because they're in afghanistan, no girls play music and i'm happy, i'm lucky. >> translator: my goal is that one day i'll be a good musician, a good music player. then i can show other people around the world that afghans are good at playing music. ♪ >> the orchestra's tour schedule also includes performances in boston as well as at the kennedy center in washington, d.c. >>> and that's going to wrap up our bulletin. i'm patchari raksawong in bangkok. >>> emerging economic powers still struggling with poverty. embolden citizens still
overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and then got out of there. of course, afghanistan fell apart and we had go back. anorak it's falling apart very, very quickly. we are facing an insurgency, we don't know what to do. like nagl, all the officers who were there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. they do know what to do so they did what they usually do. which was to bang down doors and arrest and kill people, which is anybody who would read nagl what is known is counterproductive because you wind up killing the wrong people. you inflame, you this off their brother and their cousins and they become insurgents, too. so the insurgents is going. meanwhile, petraeus upend mosul besides to put into effect the ideas of these books he's been reading. so he and his guys, they start setting up elections for the new district council. they set up the elections. they bring in fuel trucks from turkey. they read open the university. they get to mutation systems going. they get some iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens up the border to syria along northern iraq. it is all this on his own. he's
, the taliban and associated forces in response to the 9/11 attacks and we may also use force consistent with our inherent right of national self-defense. there is nothing in international law that bans the use of remotely pilotted aircraft for this purpose or that prohibits us from using lethal force against our enemies outside of an active battlefield at least when the country involved con cents or is unwilling to take action against a threat. second, targeted strikes are ethical. without question, the ability to target a specific individual from hundreds or thousands of miles away raises profound questions. here, i think it is useful to consider such strikes against the basic principle of the law of war that govern the use of force. targeted strikes conform to the principle of necessity. requirement that the target has definite military value. in this armed conflict, individuals who are part of al qaeda or its associated forces are legitimate military targets. we have the authority to target them with lethal force, just as we target enemy leaders in past conflicts such as them and the
of the president. i support him. we cannot change the equation at this point in time. the taliban have been determined to relentlessly attacked the afghan government. we have to not pull out and make sure we focus on a counterterrorism strategy compared to the surge strategy, which did not accomplish its goal. host: another word that was not mentioned was the use of drones in the confirmation hearing. guest: this is a controversial subject. i fall on the side of supporting our drone program relentlessly sorting our drone program to protect our troops and to prevent the united states from being harmed by terrorists. when al qaeda operatives were taken out by drones >>> in afghanistan and yemen -- by drone strikes in afghanistan and elsewhere, i commended the president for his counterterrorism policy. it has protected the homeland as best as any weapon we could have. it has been an effective way of putting al qaeda on the defense and keeping them on the run. the president deserves congratulations for being relentlessly consistent and persistent in his drone program. does that mean it has been
. it was to liberate because the plan was overthrow saddam, get out of there, just like we overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and god as they are and of course afghanistan fell apart and we had to go through that. we are facing an insurgency. we don't know what to do. all the officers there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. the listening manuals. they did what they usually do, banged on doors and arrest and kill people and anyone who had read kahlÚa or naco what now is counterproductive because you end up killing the wrong people. he off their cousins and brothers who may become insurgents, too. so petraeus in mozilla decides to put into effect the ideas he's learned. so he and his guys, they start setting up an election for the new district council. they said at the elections. they bring in field trip from turkey. they get communications systems going. they get iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens at the border to syria along northern iraq. he does all this on his own. he's not touring with coronation of anybody, washington or baghdad or any place that works for a while and th
and this kid is out there in the middle of nowhere with 400 taliban and in the middle east and he's tremendously courageous and tremendously brave and taking them on saving not only fellow soldiers, but ultimately saving database. ask about bravery and courage go on often every day in a war zone and i just think it's difficult to think that everybody who performs in that kind of fashion that somehow we have to establish, you know, a separate fund to try to assist them. the reality is that men and women in uniform put their lives on the line every day. it's a sacrifice for this country. and i think the great thing about this country is that there are those that are willing to do that and not worry about whether or not they're going to get an award for additional pay, but they just do it because they love this country. >> secretary, why did you, general dempsey and secretary clinton recommend that the u.s. provide weapons to the rebel forces in syria? were you disappointed the white house turned that down? and do you think is the result of that that this war could go on endlessly? >
teenagers, generally want to stop at the time they're 30 and 20 taliban it's bad for them, you remind them of the fact that they couldn't control their own destiny so they get anxious, and what did they do? facebook. it's a coping mechanism. we get a large trial at colombia university sponsored by the nih. wanting as with which we can have depressed people in the trial. we had to cancel the trial but we couldn't find a single smoker who was not clinically depressed. the fundamental insight yet again is what to do to help these folks? i would argue that you take a couple different paths. one is show them what's happening. this is what a smoker's lung looks like. you can't hide from the. just look at the darn thing. at 11:00 you see that? as emphysema. the dark tar deposits is pretty evident as well from the cigarettes. and when you see that you have awareness and understanding why this matters to you. but the second insight you have, we offer is there certain times you can change people's minds. as a heart surgeon i don't have a lot of control of people who come in for surgery. i've done my
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8